Posts tagged ‘Xamarin’

The Google Play Services APIs for Android

GooglePlayServices

Why Use the Google Play Services APIs?

Google Play Services (also known as Google APIs for Android) and abbreviated GPS, is a set of APIs that are delivered in the form of an app that can be updated via the Google Play Store. The reason Google provides these APIs this way is to reduce fragmentation of the Android platform. Fragmentation is a result of many different versions of Android running on devices out in the wild. (more…)

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May 27, 2016 at 10:05 am 1 comment

Developing iOS Apps in Visual Studio with MacinCloud

Cross-Platform Mobile Development with Xamarin

Suppose you’re a .Net XamarinLogo developer and you recently discovered Xamarin’s cross-platform framework for doing mobile app development using the .Net languages and libraries. You’ve used Visual Studio to make a killer Android app.
Now you want to make an iOS version of the app, but you don’t have a Mac– and Apple’s licensing requirements specify that you must use a iosLogoMac to build iOS apps. Apple is fine with you doing all the development (writing the code and creating the UIs) anywhere you like, but the code has to be compiled and linked on a Mac. (more…)

December 5, 2015 at 5:26 pm 8 comments

Learn to Write iOS Apps!

iPad+iPhoneNext term, Winter 2016, at Lane Community College, I will be teaching a course in iPad and iPhone app development, CS235IM, Intermediate Mobile App Development: iOS. This is a beginning course  in writing apps for iOS (the title “intermediate” is misleading). We will be using the Xamarin platform to write native apps using C#.  As a student, you will get a free Apple developer license and free Xamarin iOS and Android developer licenses. This course is offered for college credit (4 credits) and will be offered both on-campus and online. Online students can participate from anywhere in the world and at any time of the day (or night)! (more…)

November 17, 2015 at 5:50 am 2 comments

Why my next PC will be a Mac!

PDP11The first computer I programmed was a DEC PDP 11. That was way back in 1977 when I was a senior in high school. Since then, I’ve used a lot of different computers and operating systems: UNIX (and a variety of its offshoots), VMS, CPM, DOS and Windows. Did you notice there was one I didn’t mention?

OriginalMacThe first Mac I saw was the original one. I was an Electrical Engineering student at the time and it didn’t seem to be good for much besides writing term papers with nice fonts. It just couldn’t do the stuff I needed to do- like run MathCad or the Borland Turbo Pascal IDE. As time went on I developed an aversion to the seemingly snobby cultishness of Apple and its devotees. It seemed to me that if you used a Mac, you would have to buy a black turtle-neck, promise to never use any of the evil software from Redmond, and bow and pray toward Cupertino 5 times a day.

But,  (more…)

March 20, 2015 at 9:08 pm Leave a comment

Setting up a Windows PC for Xamarin Android Development

I just got done setting up a Windows 7 PC (setup for Windows 8 is identical) for Android development using the Xamarin Android application development platform. I wanted to be able to development with either Visual Studio 2013, or Xamarin Studio 5. So here are the steps I followed:

  1. (Optional) Install Visual Studio 2013 Professional or higher- you can’t use the Express Edition. Also, you will need a Xamarin Business license. Don’t worry if you don’t have Visual Studio Professional- you can use the free Xamarin Studio instead!
  2. Install the Android SDK using the “stand-alone” option. Download the Android SDK
    1. Run the Android SDK manager to update everything to the latest versions (you have to launch the SDK manager as an administrator).
    2. Using the SDK manager, add support for any Android versions you might use. You might also want to add the Google Android USB driver or Intel’s Hardware Acceleration manater (HAXM).
  3. Install an Android Debug Bridge USB driver for your hardware device. If you are using a Google Nexus device you can install the one that is provided by the Android SDK. You will need to open the Windows Device Manager and use it to install a composite adb driver. If you have a phone or tablet from another manufacturer, you will need to install a USB ADB driver for that device.
  4. Install the Xamarin software suite (this includes Xamarin Studio). Download Xamarin
  5. Install GenyMotion, an Android emulator that is vastly superior to the one included in the Android SDK. Download GenyMotion
  6. You’re done!

Now you should test your setup. Here are some things to test:

  1. Start GenyMotion and install a virtual device, then launch that device
  2. Run Xamarin Studio and open the “Hello Android” project. Select GenyMotion as the target for running the app. When you click run in Xamarin Studio, you will see the app run in the GenyMotion emulator.
  3. (Optional) Repeat the above two steps using Visual Studio
  4. Plug in a phone or tablet, enable developer mode, and select it as the target in Xamarin Studio. Now run the program again. The app should run on the device you plugged in.
  5. You’re ready to go!

September 9, 2014 at 10:01 pm Leave a comment

Xamarin Android course

You can take this class from anywhere in the world, since it is offered both on-line and on-campus! For registration and enrollment information check out the CIT Computer Programming web page.

Here is a recent syllabus: Spring 2016 Syllabus

BTW, If you aren’t a programmer and want to learn to create Android apps using a simple drag-and-drop approach, you can take our App Inventor class- CIS125M, Software Tools: Mobile Development.

September 9, 2014 at 8:39 pm Leave a comment


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