Posts tagged ‘dotNET’

Developing iOS Apps in Visual Studio with MacinCloud

Cross-Platform Mobile Development with Xamarin

Suppose you’re a .Net XamarinLogo developer and you recently discovered Xamarin’s cross-platform framework for doing mobile app development using the .Net languages and libraries. You’ve used Visual Studio to make a killer Android app.
Now you want to make an iOS version of the app, but you don’t have a Mac– and Apple’s licensing requirements specify that you must use a iosLogoMac to build iOS apps. Apple is fine with you doing all the development (writing the code and creating the UIs) anywhere you like, but the code has to be compiled and linked on a Mac. (more…)

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December 5, 2015 at 5:26 pm 8 comments

Learn to Write iOS Apps!

iPad+iPhoneNext term, Winter 2016, at Lane Community College, I will be teaching a course in iPad and iPhone app development, CS235IM, Intermediate Mobile App Development: iOS. This is a beginning course  in writing apps for iOS (the title “intermediate” is misleading). We will be using the Xamarin platform to write native apps using C#.  As a student, you will get a free Apple developer license and free Xamarin iOS and Android developer licenses. This course is offered for college credit (4 credits) and will be offered both on-campus and online. Online students can participate from anywhere in the world and at any time of the day (or night)! (more…)

November 17, 2015 at 5:50 am 2 comments

C# Pass-by-reference – Concept and example

670px-Pass-a-Soccer-Ball-Step-3-Version-2One of the concepts that many of my beginning programming students find difficult to wrap their heads around is the different ways that arguments can be passed when a method is called.  The two mechanisms for passing an argument to a method are pass-by-value and pass-by-reference.

(No, this post isn’t about soccer, I just wanted to get you thinking about passing.)

Advice to new programmers: Skip this paragraph. But the rest of this post is for you!
Before launching into our discussion, I need to clarify that we’re only talking about what happens when we pass value types to method parameters. Value types are the types enum and struct. The numeric types and bool type that are built into C# are all actually structs and so they are all value types. Interestingly, strings are not value types, they are reference types, but that’s a topic for another post!

I should make another clarification too. When I talk about the code that calls a method, I refer to the variables passed to the method as arguments, but when I talk about the code that defines a method, I call the variables inside the parenthesis parameters.

Pass by Value
Let’s take a look at a “normal” C# method definition:

     int Sum(int num1, int num2)    // this method returns the sum of num1 and num2
     {
          return num1 + num2;
     }

(more…)

March 15, 2015 at 5:20 pm Leave a comment

Happy Pi Day!

It’s Pi day and it’s a once-every-hundred-years Pi day! It’s a spceial Pi day since the year ends in 15. So the date: 3-14-15, matches the number Pi to four decimal places: 3.1415.

Kash Farooq has provided a nice set blog posts showing different methods for calculating Pi using C#. Here they are:

Calculating Pi in C# part 1 – using series algorithms

Calculating Pi in C# part 2 – using the .NET BigInteger class

Calculating Pi in C# part 3 – using the BigRational class.

March 14, 2015 at 9:45 am Leave a comment

Resources for Learning C# and .NET

CSharpLogoI compiled this list of resources for students in my Xamarin Android and iOS app development courses. These are the best resources I have found for learning C#. They are categorized for new programmers and for programmers who already know another language. If you have found some other great resources, tell everyone about them in a comment!

Everything you learn about .NET will also apply to the Mono library used by Xamarin.
(more…)

September 27, 2014 at 4:54 pm Leave a comment

Setting up a Windows PC for Xamarin Android Development

I just got done setting up a Windows 7 PC (setup for Windows 8 is identical) for Android development using the Xamarin Android application development platform. I wanted to be able to development with either Visual Studio 2013, or Xamarin Studio 5. So here are the steps I followed:

  1. (Optional) Install Visual Studio 2013 Professional or higher- you can’t use the Express Edition. Also, you will need a Xamarin Business license. Don’t worry if you don’t have Visual Studio Professional- you can use the free Xamarin Studio instead!
  2. Install the Android SDK using the “stand-alone” option. Download the Android SDK
    1. Run the Android SDK manager to update everything to the latest versions (you have to launch the SDK manager as an administrator).
    2. Using the SDK manager, add support for any Android versions you might use. You might also want to add the Google Android USB driver or Intel’s Hardware Acceleration manater (HAXM).
  3. Install an Android Debug Bridge USB driver for your hardware device. If you are using a Google Nexus device you can install the one that is provided by the Android SDK. You will need to open the Windows Device Manager and use it to install a composite adb driver. If you have a phone or tablet from another manufacturer, you will need to install a USB ADB driver for that device.
  4. Install the Xamarin software suite (this includes Xamarin Studio). Download Xamarin
  5. Install GenyMotion, an Android emulator that is vastly superior to the one included in the Android SDK. Download GenyMotion
  6. You’re done!

Now you should test your setup. Here are some things to test:

  1. Start GenyMotion and install a virtual device, then launch that device
  2. Run Xamarin Studio and open the “Hello Android” project. Select GenyMotion as the target for running the app. When you click run in Xamarin Studio, you will see the app run in the GenyMotion emulator.
  3. (Optional) Repeat the above two steps using Visual Studio
  4. Plug in a phone or tablet, enable developer mode, and select it as the target in Xamarin Studio. Now run the program again. The app should run on the device you plugged in.
  5. You’re ready to go!

September 9, 2014 at 10:01 pm Leave a comment

Xamarin Android course

You can take this class from anywhere in the world, since it is offered both on-line and on-campus! For registration and enrollment information check out the CIT Computer Programming web page.

Here is a recent syllabus: Spring 2016 Syllabus

BTW, If you aren’t a programmer and want to learn to create Android apps using a simple drag-and-drop approach, you can take our App Inventor class- CIS125M, Software Tools: Mobile Development.

September 9, 2014 at 8:39 pm Leave a comment

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